An illustration of the Chinese government monitoring Hong Kong citizens.

Chinese government builds new Great Firewall around Hong Kong

July 6th, 2020 in Articles & News

The governing body of Hong Kong rushed approval of Article 43, which grants sweeping powers to Hong Kong law enforcement, including the ability to intercept private communications and censor online media without a warrant. These regulations specify the powers that the Hong Kong government can take under the National Security Law that was passed by …

Illustration of the Apple monopoly

How Apple uses anti-competitive practices to extort developers and support authoritarian regimes

June 22nd, 2020 in Articles & News

Last week, the European Commission announced, in response to a complaint filed by Spotify, that it would be opening an investigation into Apple’s App Store practices, which potentially constitutes an illegal breach of EU competition laws. At Proton, we applaud this decision, and also Spotify’s bravery in bringing this complaint in the first place.  Following …

An image of ProtonMail's open source encryption libraries.

OpenPGP.js and GopenPGP are easier to test with other encryption suites

June 18th, 2020 in Encryption

As part of our mission to make security, privacy, and freedom accessible to all, we maintain two open source cryptography libraries that make it easier for developers to apply strong encryption in their projects. We have been the maintainers of OpenPGP.js since 2016 and GopenPGP since 2019, meaning we are responsible for ensuring these repositories …

An illustration of protesters protecing their privacy.

The Proton guide to privacy at protests

June 17th, 2020 in Privacy

From Hong Kong to Minneapolis, protesters around the world are standing up for their human rights. The right to peaceful assembly and protest are bedrocks of democracy, and we support everyone’s ability to exercise these rights. We created ProtonMail to protect people’s privacy and freedom from encroaching surveillance. For this reason, activists around the world …

Illstration of the surveillance represented by user data requests.

Massive corporate databases become government tools of surveillance

June 16th, 2020 in Privacy

The number of data requests the US government sent to Google has increased 510% since 2010. US government requests to Facebook have also increased 364% since the beginning of 2013. The databases of private companies are increasingly being used to monitor individuals with little transparency into the process. In 2013, when Edward Snowden revealed the …

An illustration of a TLS certificate.

What is a TLS/SSL certificate, and how does it work?

June 11th, 2020 in Security

Whenever you send or receive information on the Internet, it passes through a network of multiple computers to reach the destination. Historically, any of these computers could read your data, because it was not encrypted. Much of this data is quite sensitive — and valuable to hackers. It can include private communications that are not end-to-end …

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Getting started with ProtonMail the easy way

May 28th, 2020 in Articles & News

This article takes you through all the factors to consider when moving to a new email provider and leaving privacy-invasive companies such as Gmail, Outlook, and Yahoo Mail. Switching your email provider may feel as difficult as moving to a new house or changing your name. There’s so much to do: telling your contacts, updating …

An illustration of COVID-19 contact tracing apps.

What you need to know about contact tracing apps and privacy

May 15th, 2020 in Privacy

Nearly all public health experts say we will have to employ testing and tracing on a massive scale to combat the spread of COVID-19. This has led a number of countries and tech companies to develop coronavirus contact tracing apps for smartphones. The idea is that such an app would allow someone who tested positive …

An illustration of anonymized data.

The truth about anonymized data

April 30th, 2020 in Privacy

Many companies that handle personal information reassure their users by saying that all the data is “anonymized.” If you don’t know any better, that sounds reassuring. However, the method most companies use to anonymize data and the size of modern databases make it easy for attackers to re-identify individuals. From medical records to cell phone …

An illustration of the multi-account feature for iOS.

Multi-account feature enters beta on ProtonMail iOS

April 29th, 2020 in Releases

Version 1.12 of ProtonMail iOS lets you manage multiple ProtonMail accounts on your phone without needing to log in and log out repeatedly. This makes it perfect for business owners, freelancers, or anyone else who likes to use multiple inboxes to stay organized. Multi-account support Ever since we introduced the multi-account feature for ProtonMail Android, …

An illustration of the ProtonMail Android app going open source.

All ProtonMail apps are now open source, as Android joins the list!

April 23rd, 2020 in Articles & News

Starting today, every app you use to access your ProtonMail inbox is open source and has passed an independent security audit. One of our guiding principles is transparency. You deserve to know who we are, how our products can and cannot protect you, and how we keep your data private. We believe this level of …

illustration of ProtonMail Android client security

ProtonMail Android client security

April 23rd, 2020 in Security

The following article presents a high-level overview of ProtonMail’s Android security model and explains how the app protects users’ sensitive data. You can view our Android app’s open source code on GitHub. We also explain the importance of open source to Proton in our Android open source announcement.  For more information on what threats ProtonMail …

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