An illustration of content scanning that could happen under EARN IT.

EARN IT is a dangerous law that could be used to break encryption

August 4th, 2020 in Encryption

We recently wrote about a proposed law in the United States known as the Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act (LAED Act), which would basically ban encryption by requiring companies to build a backdoor. But this is not the only effort underway in the US Congress that attempts to destroy privacy as we know it. …

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Four misleading claims tech CEOs told Congress

July 30th, 2020 in Privacy

On Wednesday, the CEOs of four massive tech companies — Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon — testified before a congressional investigation about those companies’ anti-competitive practices. The CEOs were eager to portray their companies as under constant threat from competitors. However, the congressional subcommittee raised multiple examples of the companies using their power to spy on, …

Three basic facts Congress must understand about Big Tech

July 24th, 2020 in Articles & News

Wednesday, July 29, is an important day for the future of the Internet. At noon local time in Washington, DC, the CEOs of Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google will appear virtually before US lawmakers who are investigating their companies for illegal anticompetitive practices. But there is a big risk that legislators will once again miss …

An illustration of the Chinese government using TikTok to watch its users.

TikTok and the privacy perils of China’s first international social media platform

July 23rd, 2020 in Privacy

TikTok, the video-sharing platform owned by the Chinese social media giant ByteDance, is one of the most popular social media services in the world, with an estimated 800 million users. However, its zealous data collection, use of Chinese infrastructure, and its parent company’s close ties to the Chinese Communist Party make it a perfect tool …

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The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act wants to ban strong encryption

July 22nd, 2020 in Encryption

The United States Congress is considering a law that would destroy online privacy as we know it and essentially outlaw the most secure American tech products, such as Signal. The law would ban end-to-end encryption for large companies and require developers to break their own products at the request of law enforcement agencies. The bill …

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Chinese government builds new Great Firewall around Hong Kong

July 6th, 2020 in Articles & News

The governing body of Hong Kong rushed approval of Article 43, which grants sweeping powers to Hong Kong law enforcement, including the ability to intercept private communications and censor online media without a warrant. These regulations specify the powers that the Hong Kong government can take under the National Security Law that was passed by …

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How Apple uses anti-competitive practices to extort developers and support authoritarian regimes

June 22nd, 2020 in Articles & News

Last week, the European Commission announced, in response to a complaint filed by Spotify, that it would be opening an investigation into Apple’s App Store practices, which potentially constitutes an illegal breach of EU competition laws. At Proton, we applaud this decision, and also Spotify’s bravery in bringing this complaint in the first place.  Following …

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OpenPGP.js and GopenPGP are easier to test with other encryption suites

June 18th, 2020 in Encryption

As part of our mission to make security, privacy, and freedom accessible to all, we maintain two open source cryptography libraries that make it easier for developers to apply strong encryption in their projects. We have been the maintainers of OpenPGP.js since 2016 and GopenPGP since 2019, meaning we are responsible for ensuring these repositories …

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The Proton guide to privacy at protests

June 17th, 2020 in Privacy

From Hong Kong to Minneapolis, protesters around the world are standing up for their human rights. The right to peaceful assembly and protest are bedrocks of democracy, and we support everyone’s ability to exercise these rights. We created ProtonMail to protect people’s privacy and freedom from encroaching surveillance. For this reason, activists around the world …

Illstration of the surveillance represented by user data requests.

Massive corporate databases become government tools of surveillance

June 16th, 2020 in Privacy

The number of data requests the US government sent to Google has increased 510% since 2010. US government requests to Facebook have also increased 364% since the beginning of 2013. The databases of private companies are increasingly being used to monitor individuals with little transparency into the process. In 2013, when Edward Snowden revealed the …

An illustration of a TLS certificate.

What is a TLS/SSL certificate, and how does it work?

June 11th, 2020 in Security

Whenever you send or receive information on the Internet, it passes through a network of multiple computers to reach the destination. Historically, any of these computers could read your data, because it was not encrypted. Much of this data is quite sensitive — and valuable to hackers. It can include private communications that are not end-to-end …

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Getting started with ProtonMail the easy way

May 28th, 2020 in Articles & News

This article takes you through all the factors to consider when moving to a new email provider and leaving privacy-invasive companies such as Gmail, Outlook, and Yahoo Mail. Switching your email provider may feel as difficult as moving to a new house or changing your name. There’s so much to do: telling your contacts, updating …

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